Subjective well being influenced by creatine?

hr-line

Subjective well being influenced by creatine?

  • Creatine supplementation helps improve physical function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis. This benefit is supported by a study done in 2011 on postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis. Participating women were divided into 2 groups; one taking creatine and the other taking placebo. They were enrolled in a lower limb resistance training program. This study took 12 weeks. At the end of the study, physical function and stiffness significantly improved in the creatine group only. Pain was relieved in both groups because of the effect of exercise on osteoarthritis.1
  • Creatine supplementation can improve central executive task performance and cognitive functions. This finding is supported by a study designed in 2007. Participants were divided into 2 groups; one taking creatine and the other taking placebo. They were deprived of sleep for 36 hours during which they undertook tests examining central executive functioning at 18 h, 24 h and 36 hours. Creatine group performed significantly better than the placebo group but only in the third test.2

  • Body muscle creatine levels are depressed in patients with congestive heart failure including heart muscles. Creatine supplementation was found in a 2006 study to increase body weight and improve muscle strength in patients with congestive heart failure improving the quality of life. In this study, 20 heart failure patients were divided into 2 groups; one taking creatine and the other taking placebo. After 6 weeks, the creatine group were found to have improved muscle strength and increased body weight.3
  • Sleep deprivation has a negative effect on cognitive and psychomotor performance and mood state, partially due to decreases in creatine levels in the brain, so creatine supplementation was found to antagonize these negative effects. This is supported by a study designed in 2006. Participants were divided into 2 groups; one taking creatine and the other taking placebo. The participants undertook tests of random movement generation, verbal and spatial recall, choice reaction time, static balance and mood state pretest, after 6 h, 12 h and 24 hours of sleep deprivation. The creatine group were higher in mental functions after 24 hours of sleep deprivation compared to the placebo group.4
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease caused mainly by excessive smoking. Its main symptoms are cough, difficulty in breathing and muscle wasting. Creatine supplementation was found to increase peripheral muscle strength, endurance and health status in those patients in a study made in 2005. Thirty-eight COPD patients were divided into 2 groups; one taking creatine and the other taking placebo. After 2 weeks, the creatine group showed improved muscle performance, endurance and health status.5
  • Creatine supplementation was found to improve life quality in cystic fibrosis patients. A study done in 2003 showed positive health effects on those patients. Eighteen cystic fibrosis patients were given creatine supplementation for 12 weeks. After the study, the patients showed improved muscle strength and general well-being.6
  • benefits

    REFERENCES

    1. Neves M Jr, Gualano B, Roschel H, et al. PubMed. Bethesda, Maryland: National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2011. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21311365. Accessed May 07, 2016.
    2. McMorris T, Harris RC, Howard AN, et al. PubMed. Bethesda, Maryland: National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2007. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17046034. Accessed May 07, 2016.
    3. Kuethe F, Krack A, Richartz BM, Figulla HR. PubMed. Bethesda, Maryland: National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16599263. Accessed May 07, 2016.
    4. McMorris T, Harris RC, Swain J, et al. PubMed. Bethesda, Maryland: National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16416332. Accessed May 07, 2016.
    5. Fuld JP, Kilduff LP, Neder JA, et al. PubMed. Bethesda, Maryland: National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15994258. Accessed May 07, 2016.
    6. Braegger CP, Schlattner U, Wallimann T, et al. PubMed. Bethesda, Maryland: National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2003. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15463870. Accessed May 07, 2016.
Real Time Analytics
Skip to toolbar